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How long before Chuck (the porno looking Santa) is called a racist?  We already heard that this is all a "political" and "colonial" plan / idea by the "Brits" and "Americans" - or so it was said by Fuckwitz at the news conference.

 

 

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Maybe now he is in gaol he can finish the book.

 

oh you mean it's not George RR Martin.

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Gloves off as former FIFA VP vows to tell all

PORT OF SPAIN, TRINIDAD - Former FIFA Vice President Jack Warner, a central figure in world soccer's deepening scandal, has vowed to tell investigators all he knows about corruption within the sport's governing body.

In a paid political address entitled "The gloves are off" broadcast in Trinidad and Tobago late on Wednesday, Warner said he feared for his life, but would reveal everything he knows.

He said he had instructed his lawyers to contact law enforcement officials both in his homeland and overseas.

"There can be no reversal of the course of action I've now embarked upon," said Warner, a prominent local politician and businessman.

He said some of the documents he had related to financial dealings with FIFA, some of which are being investigated by US authorities. But he also said he had documents linking FIFA with the 2010 Trinidad and Tobago government elections.

"I have kept quiet, fearing this day might come. I will do so no more."

"I will no longer keep secrets for them who actively seek to destroy the country," he said.

Warner is among more than a dozen officials charged by the US Department of Justice with running a criminal enterprise that involved more than $150 million in bribes.

Prosecutors say Warner solicited bribes worth millions and charged him with offences including racketeering and bribery.

His address on Wednesday came hours after American Chuck Blazer, another former FIFA executive committee member, admitted taking bribes relating to a range of tournaments, including the 1998 and 2010 World Cups.

Source

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No wonder the SAFA cowards send their resident pit-bull Mbalula (a world cup winner for denial & spin) to the pressers alone.

Those who underestimate the FBI are going to learn a few new tricks about investigative procedures - put money on it!!

Sing you FIFA thugs, sing loud & sing long!!

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No wonder the SAFA cowards send their resident pit-bull Mbalula (a world cup winner for denial & spin) to the pressers alone.

Those who underestimate the FBI are going to learn a few new tricks about investigative procedures - put money on it!!

Sing you FIFA thugs, sing loud & sing long!!

TruthShocks.jpg

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No wonder the SAFA cowards send their resident pit-bull Mbalula (a world cup winner for denial & spin) to the pressers alone.

Those who underestimate the FBI are going to learn a few new tricks about investigative procedures - put money on it!!

Sing you FIFA thugs, sing loud & sing long!!

​The NSA will be able to hand over the necessary emails - they might not be admissible in court but they will steer the FBI in the right direction as to where the money went

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What our dear minister conveniently forgets to respond to is this (from Ray Hartley).................

Section VI of the indictment is entitled “The Criminal Schemes” and section G is headed by the words “2010 FIFA World Cup Vote Scheme”.

The indictment details how Warner and his family cultivated their relationship with South African soccer officials during the failed bid to host the 2006 World Cup.

The indictment describes how during the early 2000s, Warner took his first bribe from South Africa, directing a family member to fly to Paris “and accept a briefcase containing bundles of US currency in $10,000 stacks in a hotel room from Co-Conspirator #15.”

Co-Conspirator #15 is not named but is described in the indictment as “a high-ranking official of the 2006 South Africa World Cup bid committee and the 2010 South Africa World Cup bid committee and local organizing committee.” A second South African  - Co-Conspirator #16 – is given the same description.

The family member boarded a return flight to Trinidad and Tobago where he handed the briefcase full of money over to Warner.

This was a taste of what was to come. In 2004, the stakes were higher as South Africa found itself competing against weaker opposition in Morocco and Egypt for a World Cup that, it had already been decided, would be hosted by an African country.

In the months ahead of the May 2004 vote, Warner traveled to Morocco where, as was by now the custom, he was offered a bribe of US $1 million for his vote.

Not long after this offer was made, South Africa had to up the ante. Warner was made an offer he could not refuse – South Africa would pay $10 million to the Caribbean Football Union – a body controlled by Warner and described in the indictment as being financially intertwined with his personal bank accounts. The money, the South Africans are said to have told Warner was a payment to “support the African diaspora”.

Warner told an American Fifa executive that he and a third executive with voting rights would get $1 million of the money, if they voted for South Africa.

South Africa beat Morocco by 14 votes to 10. The three votes secured by the $10 million had turned out to be the difference between winning and losing. At a ceremony where the outcome was announced Nelson Mandela famously held the football trophy aloft. It was a Madiba moment, but the machinations that had made it possible were anything but saintly.

 

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​The NSA will be able to hand over the necessary emails - they might not be admissible in court but they will steer the FBI in the right direction as to where the money went

​I'll put R5 on Australia still getting to host the world cup.............:bounce:

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​I'll put R5 on Australia still getting to host the world cup.............:bounce:

The cheap bastards only paid 500k to conacef. That's why they didn't get it the first time.

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The cheap bastards only paid 500k to conacef. That's why they didn't get it the first time.

​They managed to spend $46 million of taxpayers money on the bid somehow. One cheque to David's uncle for $10,000,000 would have been more useful.

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​I'll put R5 on Australia still getting to host the world cup.............:bounce:

​The other codes had to be dragged kicking and screaming to agree to vacate stadiums for a month in the middle of their seasons for the original bid. They won't agree again.

Edited by Docker

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Seems that world cups (all sport - including Olympics) by and large are sordid business' where public are ripped-off with bribes and fixings all to further enrich people who are already very, very handsomely remunerated for something they should actually be doing for "the love" of the sport.  It makes you sick to think that fans actually support this crap!

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FIFA paid FAI after controversial World Cup play-off exit

 

John Delaney has confirmed FIFA paid the Football Association of Ireland millions of euros to stop them launching a legal case over their World Cup play-off defeat to France in 2009.

 A handball in the build-up to William Gallas' extra-time goal ultimately sent France through to the 2010 finals in South Africa at the expense of the Republic of Ireland. 

The controversial incident in the second leg of their play-off, which finished 1-1 to give France a 2-1 aggregate win, was not spotted by Swedish referee Martin Hansson and left the FAI fuming.

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Such a sordid business it is just not true:

A lesson for that pygmy minister with his loud mouth.

Kids had to tell a teacher what they observed in nature and what, if any, did they learn from it.

Well, like always young Taipan was the last to respond.

Sir, I observed a little bird walking behind the cattle on my uncle's farm.  They were clever because as the cattle disturbed the grass little insects would fly or run away and the bird will have an easy prey.  But, as nature would have it, a cow promptly shat all over a little bird walking in its wake.  The little bird screamed and screeched because it could not get free.  Suddenly from high in the sky came a hawk and swooped down catching the bird and eating it.

The teacher was taken aback by the story yet asked little TP what he learned from it.

 

 Sir, if you are deep in shit it is best to keep your mouth tightly shut!

 

And that Mr. Minister is what you should have done, but then again you act on the example of your boss....

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Such a sordid business it is just not true:

​Depressingly true and paints a grim future ahead.

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They should have admitted the bribe. Anyone with half a brain knows you couldn't get the WC without bribing. 

 

If if that came straight out and said Blatter forced us into it otherwise Morooco would have out bribed us, they would have got the sympathy vote. Now that are just looking stupid.

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See how they run like pigs from a gun see how they run...........:bounce::36_11_6:

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See how they run like pigs from a gun see how they run...........:bounce::36_11_6:

​And the PE Mayor is slip-sliding...

 

http://mg.co.za/article/2015-06-04-danny-jordaans-damning-letter-to-fifa#.VXFBdEFtAi8.twitter

 

A letter implicates the SA World Cup boss and Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma in the $10-million payment now alleged to be a bribe.

Danny Jordaan pays a visit to the Nelson Mandela Stadium in Port Elizabeth. (Stephen James Williams)

South African 2010 World Cup boss Danny Jordaan asked Fifa to pay the $10-million that United States prosecutors allege was a bribe after he had a discussion with Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma, now the African Union chairperson.

Jordaan, a former anti-apartheid activist who re-entered politics as the Nelson Mandela Bay mayor last week, put the request to Fifa secretary general Jérôme Valcke in a December 2007 letter, which names Dlamini-Zuma and Jabu Moleketi, respectively foreign affairs minister and deputy finance minister under former president Thabo Mbeki.

 
 
 
 

Read Jordaan’s letter here

This supports the allegation, first contained in the US indictment of football officials internationally and unsealed last week, that the government of South Africa had agreed to a bribe, disguised as a football development contribution, for Caribbean football boss Jack Warner and two others.

The payment was allegedly to secure their support in the Fifa executive committee vote that won South Africa the right to host the 2010 World Cup.

Sports Minister Fikile Mbalula, speaking for the government, has insisted that the $10-million payment was intended as a bona fide contribution to football development in the Caribbean. But it is understood from a senior government source that members of President Jacob Zuma’s Cabinet are privately not convinced of this.

Worldwide scandal
The allegations about South Africa have become the sharp end of the worldwide scandal unleashed by the US indictment, which describes “corruption that is rampant, systemic and deep-rooted” in football. Among those in the firing line are Valcke, whom the New York Times has outed as the unnamed Fifa official allegedly central to the $10-million payment.

Valcke, backed by Fifa, this week denied initiating or authorising the payment, saying the Fifa finance committee head, who has since died, had done so.

But Jordaan’s letter confirms that Valcke was the South Africans’ contact in the matter. Like a subsequent letter from Molefi Oliphant, then the South African Football Association president, Jordaan addressed his letter to Valcke. Oliphant’s letter was leaked earlier this week.

Read Oliphant’s letter here

This week the Mail & Guardian also heard of an allegation that Fifa president Sepp Blatter encouraged the South African government at the highest level to accede to Warner’s request (See “How much did Blatter and Mbeki know?”).

On Wednesday, Warner himself pointed a finger at Blatter. In a rambling television advertisement, he said he would no longer “keep secrets” for Fifa and that he had evidence supporting “my knowledge of transactions at Fifa, including but not limited to its president, Mr Sepp Blatter”. Blatter had announced his impending retirement the day before.

‘A promise’
Jordaan’s letter to Valcke, like Oliphant’s later one, ascribes the payment to “a promise by the South African government”, before grappling with a predicament also identified in the US indictment: although the government allegedly agreed to the payment before the May 2004 Fifa vote, it subsequently shied away from paying it directly, presumably because of the risk.

The indictment cites Chuck Blazer, the US football boss and Warner’s associate, as “periodically” asking Warner about his cut. He then learnt that “the South Africans were unable to arrange for the payment to be made directly from government funds”.

Blazer pleaded guilty in a secret 2013 plea agreement before assisting US authorities. In a New York District Court transcript unsealed this week, he confirmed: “I and others on the Fifa executive committee agreed to accept bribes in conjunction with the selection of South Africa as the host nation for the 2010 World Cup.”

Jordaan’s letter is dated December 10 2007, three weeks before the first of three tranches totalling $10-million flowed from Fifa to accounts controlled by Warner, according to the indictment. It charges that Warner took most of the money for himself and passed $750 000 on to Blazer. A third unnamed official was allegedly also intended to benefit.

Jordaan tells Valcke: “The South African government has undertaken to pay an amount equivalent to US$10-million towards the 2010 Fifa World Cup diaspora legacy programme”, which ostensibly had to ensure the African diaspora in the Caribbean benefited.

Recommendation
Jordaan says Jabu Moleketi, then deputy finance minister and a member of his 2010 local organising committee (LOC), “recommended that this money be paid over to Fifa”. 

This appears to suggest that Moleketi felt the government should pay Fifa, that would in turn pay Warner’s development fund.

Moleketi claimed on Thursday that the letter was “a fabrication”, and denied having “a conversation of that nature” with Jordaan.

Jordaan’s letter continues: “I have subsequently had a discussion with the minister of foreign affairs, Dr Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma, who has said that the [government] funds should rather be paid over to the [LOC]. In view of this determination, I want to suggest that Fifa deducts this amount from the LOC’s future operational budget and deals directly with the diaspora legacy support programme.”

This proposed triangular arrangement further distanced the government from a payment displaying the hallmarks of money laundering: Fifa would pay Warner, offsetting that against payments Fifa owed to the LOC, and the government would compensate the LOC for the resulting hole in its accounts.

Formal instruction
Oliphant’s letter to Valcke was dated March 4 2008, three months after Jordaan’s. Although it contained the formal instruction to Fifa to effect the transfers, two of the three tranches had already been paid, implying that Jordaan’s letter, and possibly other communications, had already given Fifa the comfort to proceed.

Damningly, Oliphant’s letter also asked that Fifa put Warner in personal control of the money. This is consistent with the US allegation that the diaspora programme was a fiction to cover the intention that Warner, Blazer and the unnamed official should benefit personally.

Oliphant specified: “The diaspora legacy programme shall be administered and implemented directly by the president of Concacaf, who shall act as the fiduciary of the diaspora legacy programme fund of US$10-million.”

Warner was the president of Concacaf, the football confederation of North and Central America and the Caribbean, and Blazer its secretary general.

Mbalula, in several statements and, as the scandal escalated, at a press conference on Wednesday, insisted the payment was not intended as a bribe. “It was legacy money. South Africa chose to support the diaspora. It is our own policy of supporting the African diaspora. That is why the money was given to Concacaf.”

Denial
He confirmed that the government and the South African Football Association (Safa) had initiated the payment, but denied that any public money was used. Indeed, financial reports of Fifa and the South African department of sport and recreation make no specific mention of government transfers to the LOC.

But National Lotteries Board records show that it transferred a cumulative R88-million to the LOC over the three years, starting in 2008. The amount, at the exchange rate of the time, was roughly equivalent to the $10-million hole left in the accounts of the LOC, and ultimately Safa. It was earmarked for the building of Safa football fields in South Africa.

Dlamini-Zuma, who also served on the LOC, did not respond to queries sent to her AU spokesperson, Jacob Enoh-Eban, on Thursday.

Moleketi said neither he nor Dlamini-Zuma, as LOC nonexecutive directors, had the authority to approve a payment. “In short, I think it is far-fetched. I have never seen such a letter; I have never had such a conversation with Danny Jordaan. So it is quite clear that the government was never involved in this matter.”

Jordaan declined to comment and said in an SMS: “Ministers dealt with issue.”

Stefaans Brümmer, Sally Evans, Sam Sole and Tabelo Timse contributed to this story.

 


*After the print deadline for this story, Fifa spokesperson Delia Fischer responded to the allegation that Jordaan’s letter to Valcke suggests the latter was intimately involved with the $10-million payment, despite earlier denials.

This is her response:
“It suggests nothing of the sort. As Mr Valcke has already explained, all requests of any kind have to be made formally through the secretary general’s office.  As our statement already says, Safa instructed Fifa that the diaspora legacy programme should be administered and implemented directly by the president of Concacaf who at that time was deputy chairman of the finance committee and who should act as the fiduciary of the diaspora legacy programme fund of US$10-million. “The payments totalling US$10-million were authorised by the then chairman of the finance committee and executed in accordance with the organisation regulations of FIFA. FIFA did not incur any costs as a result of South Africa’s request because the funds belonged to the LOC. Both the LOC and SAFA adhered to the necessary formalities for the budgetary amendment.”

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