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Interesting Technical Stuff!

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So, today I turned my office TV into a full Windows 10 PC with HD resolution and controlled from my Samsung Smart phone - which now is a mouse track-pad and a keyboard - no wires no nothing.  How did I do that?

I stuck an Intel compute stick into the HDMI port - jumped the charger to the TV USB port (the only wire) and installed Intel Remote Keyboard on my phone.

Now I am typing this and surfung the Internet using just my cellular phone and the TV.  Because all my emails are consolidated under Outlook.com and all my docs are in One Drive - I have no problems.

The Compute stick is as big as a large USB data-device and fits into your pocket easily.  Now you can goi to a client who has a TV in the boardroom and do a presentation without lugging a laptop around.

 

http://www.intel.co.za/content/www/za/en/compute-stick/intel-compute-stick.html

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.intel.remotekeyboard

906247-computestick-feature-performance-

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History of the Atlantic Cable & Undersea Communications

 

http://atlantic-cable.com//Cables/CableTimeLine/atlantic.htm

This page shows Atlantic cables and their connecting systems, extracted from the main Cable Timeline.
Click on the Route links to see cable samples, the Company or Operator links for full descriptions, the ship name links to see descriptions or images. 
Please note that Timeline entries within each year are not necessarily chronological, as the exact date of laying is generally not known.
WFS = Withdrawn From Service
See also this paper by Alsadair Wilkie on Route Clearance for Hibernia Express, which describes the locating and clearing of many earlier Atlantic cables during the laying of Hibernia's new cable in 2015. 
Entries on this page (up until 1912) with detailed manufacturing records in the notes column have information from the Telcon Record Book of Submarine Cables Manufactured and Laid by the TC&M Company. Volume 1: 1850-1912. High resolution scans of this book were made by its present curator, Alcatel-Lucent of Greenwich, successor to the Telegraph Construction & Maintenance Company, and were provided to the Atlantic Cable site by Allan Green. Thanks as always to Bill Glover for his meticulous transcription of these records.

1856-Cabot-Strait-Cable_s.jpg

The parts of the 1856 Cabot Strait cable re-assembled. Two new armouring wires of similar gauge were fitted to replace the missing ones, and the core was padded out to the correct diameter with black twine to represent the tarred twine used originally. A note with the cable describes the restoration.

 

And then today's Artic Fibre..

image-478148-galleryV9-fovg-478148.jpg

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Cool Stuff

 

This tiny disk will solve your memory problems on your PC forever

360-664x374.jpg

The successor to the flash drives we use could be this quartz minidisk in the picture above. But it’s not just the shape that makes this little thing special, it’s its amazing ability of storing up to360TB (terabytes) of memory!

Just to put things into perspective, usually we’d be happy with 2TB of memory, but even that’s a lot to ask for these days. With this disk, you could store up to 130 times more photos, documents, videos, software and anything else you can think of.

This invention, which for the time being is just an experiment, was created by research scientists at the University of Southampton (UK). Besides having an almost unlimited capacity,due to the material composition of quartz, it can also last up to 14,000 years. This will be something that will outlive us all!

Below you can see a video (although it’s not the fastest video) that explains the manufacturing process of the disk. Enjoy!

 

 

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There was also a You Tune clip about the next generation of battery tech, which is also being developed in the UK. The basics of it is a layer of carbon, one atom thick, between two layers of silicon (IIRC). It can hold an enormous amount of power for a moerse long time. I have searched for it but I just cannot remember where I found it. The tech is basically already there, they are now working on makig it economically viable. 

I think that once they have managed that, the days of the combustion engine in cars would probably be numbered. The only piece of the puzzle that would still have to be sorted out is a way to generate all the required electricity.

Edited by vlagman

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This?

 

 

Future batteries, coming soon: charge in seconds, last months and power over the air

 

While smartphones, smarthomes and even smart wearables are growing ever more advanced, they're still limited by power. The battery hasn't advanced in decades. But we're on the verge of a power revolution.

Big technology companies, and now car companies that are making electric vehicles, are all too aware of the limitations of current lithium-ion batteries. While chips and operating systems are becoming more efficient to save power we're still only looking at a day or two of use on a smartphone before having to recharge. That's why universities are getting involved.

We've seen a plethora of battery discoveries coming out of universities all over the world. Tech companies and car manufacturers are pumping money into battery development. And with races like Formula E adding pressure to improve, that technology is only going to get greater.

ut while we've been writing about these developments for years there's still nothing in our phones. This is because everyone is waiting for the perfect replacement before making the jump. That and commitments to current batteries thanks to manufacturing techniques that cost a lot to change and existing deals for minerals being hard to break.

Next year is starting to shape up as the year batteries change. We've collected all the best battery discoveries that could be with us soon. From over the air charging to super-fast 30-second re-charging, you could be seeing this tech in your gadgets sooner than you think.
<snip>

 

Solid state lithium-ion

Solid state batteries traditionally offer stability but at the cost of electrolyte transmissions. A paper published by Toyota scientists writesabout their tests of a solid state battery which uses sulfide superionic conductors. All this means a superior battery.

The result is a battery that can operate at super capacitor levels to completely charge or discharge in just seven minutes - making it ideal for cars. Since it's solid state that also means it's far more stable and safer than current batteries. The solid-state unit should also be able to work in as low as minus 30 degrees Celsius and up to one hundred. 

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Ahhh. That is it Graphene. Although this is an eight minute clip, it is still not the documentary that I saw:

 

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Yep. Coming along nicely thanks. Still haven't figured out the Outlook and Yahoo issue though. Down to a bad dose of procrastination, I suppose. :bounce:

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Setting up outlook is pretty straight forward. Just add your usernam and password and outlook will configure the rest and will most likely use IMAP

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Thanks Barlee, will keep in mind. I have a few issues when I switched from windows 8.1 to windows 10 and it looks like all the shit has been sorted now and maybe it is time to give it a go again. I am still using Windows Live Messenger 12 at the moment.

I have my Yahoo set-up as IMAP/SMTP. Had to do it for WIndows Live Messenger as well. EVen switched it back to POP3 as well and still got issues. Will let you guys know if I still have issues when I try it again.

Thanks.

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1 hour ago, vlagman said:

Yep. Coming along nicely thanks. Still haven't figured out the Outlook and Yahoo issue though. Down to a bad dose of procrastination, I suppose. :bounce:

GOT procrastination. oh well if I had to choose gOT would win too :)

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The Source

feyman_atomic_top.jpg?w=738&h=474

Here’s an interesting milestone to talk up around the water cooler: researchers in the Netherlands have created a microscopic storage system that encodes every bit with a single atom — allowing them to fit a kilobyte in a space under 100 nanometers across.

That translates to a storage density of about 500 terabits per square inch. For comparison, those 4-terabyte hard drives you can buy today are about 1 terabit per square inch. That’s because, unlike this new system, they use hundreds or thousands of atoms to store a single bit.

“In theory, this storage density would allow all books ever created by humans to be written on a single post stamp,” said Sander Otte, lead scientist at Delft University of Technology, in a news release. That doesn’t really give you an idea of how cool this tech is, though.

The storage array (“hard drive” isn’t exactly accurate, but gets the point across) is remarkably elegant in its organization — as it has to be if it is going to work at an atomic level.

“Every bit consists of two positions on a surface of copper atoms, and one chlorine atom that we can slide back and forth between these two positions,” explained Otte. Because chlorine on copper forms into a perfectly square grid, it’s easy (relatively, anyway) to position and read them. If the chlorine atom is up top, that’s a 1; if it’s at the bottom, that’s a 0. Put 8 chlorine atoms in a row and they form a byte.

atomic-storage-ani.gif?w=480&h=270

Then there are a few special marks that indicate things like the end of a line or file, or that the next space should be ignored (in case of damage, for instance). Altogether the system is efficient enough that they were able to store hundreds of letters into a 96×128 nanometer space (12 rows and 12 columns, each cell holding 8 bytes). And it’s easy enough to do these manipulations that the process can be automated.

block_code.png?w=440&h=327

The data the researchers chose to demonstrate this was a fragment of a Feynman lecture, “There’s plenty of room at the bottom” (PDF) — fittingly, about storing data at extremely small scales. (You can see a high-resolution image of the array here.)

This is strictly lab-bound, though, at least for now. The chlorine-copper array is only stable in a clean vacuum and at 77 kelvin — about the temperature of liquid nitrogen. Anything past that and heat will disrupt the organization of the atoms.

It’s early-stage research, but still promising. The idea of using individual atoms as bit storage is something many scientists have dreamed of, and the applications of such dense storage are, of course, innumerable. The research was published today in the journal Nature Nanotechnology.

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Where to get the story..

Cryptocurrencies have hit the headlines again this week, but this time it is not for good reasons. Nicknamed “WannaMine”, a new malware variant has been taking over computers around the world, hijacking them to mine a cryptocurrency called Monero.

WannaMine was first discovered by Panda Security in October last year, but the malware is only just coming to the attention of the general public, thanks to a number of high profile infections. But unlike other malware variants, WannaMine is proving particularly hard to detect and block.

What does WannaMine do?

At the most basic level, WannaMine has been designed to mine a cryptocurrency called Monero. The malware silently infects a victim’s computer, and then uses it to run complex decryption routines that create new Monero. The currency is then added to a digital wallet belonging to the hackers, ready to be spent whenever they choose.

This may sound relatively harmless, but the mining process takes priority over legitimate activities. An infected computer begins to slow down – a particularly frustrating experience for users.

What is the problem?

There are several serious problems with WannaMine. First, the way in which it tries to make maximum use of the processor and RAM places the computer under great strain. Eventually the computer will begin to fail, requiring costly repairs – or even complete replacement.

The second major problem is to do with the way in which WannaMine spreads itself. Initially there is nothing unusual about the malware – users are tricked into downloading the malware via email attachments or infected websites. Once installed however, WannaMine uses some very clever tricks to spread across the network.

By using two (important) built-in Windows tools – PowerShell and Windows Management Instrumentation – WannaMine tries to capture login details that allow it to connect to other computers remotely. If that technique fails, WannaMine then falls back on the same security exploit (EternalBlue) used by the WannaCry ransomware to spread itself.

Because it uses built-in Windows tools WannaMine is being described as “fileless”, making it incredibly hard to detect and block. In fact, some reports suggest that many traditional anti-virus applications cannot detect WannaMine, or protect users against it.

Protecting against WannaMine

The only way to spot a WannaMine infection is by carefully monitoring the applications and services running on a computer, using a technique that Panda Security call “Adaptive Defense”. Panda Security scans all incoming files and prevents infection before WannaMine can compromise a computer.

As well as having a robust, modern anti-virus application installed on all your computers, it is vital that they are all routinely updated and patched to close the loopholes used by malware. The EternalBlue exploit used by WannaMine and WannaCry was patched by Microsoft in March 2017 – but many Windows users have not applied the update, leaving themselves vulnerable.

Keeping your computer up-to-date and installing security tools like Panda Antivirus will help to block cryptocurrency malware before it can take over your computer. And as WannaMine shows – if your computer is infected, it may soon spread to other computers and devices on your network.

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Goeie Genade!  <<Careful when clicking the link - explicit images>>  NSFW

BLADE STUNNERS 

Inside the Chinese sex doll factory making ‘smart’ robots that can also talk, play music and even do the dishes

The lid is lifted on one of the most pioneering babe bot plants in the world where production is being stepped up to meet the demands of sex-starved lads the world over

THESE photographs lay bare the progress being made in mass producing incredibly realistic sex robots to meet a booming demand across the globe.

Row upon row of voluptuous silicon bodies can be seen hanging on production lines at EXDOLL’s plant based in the north-eastern China port city of Dalian.

The company makes 400 custom dolls per month, up from 10 in 2009.

It began research into sexbots in mid-2016 and now employs 120 people with plans to expand.

On the factory floor for "traditional" sex dolls, buyers can customise each doll for height, skin tone, breast size, amount of pubic hair, eye colour and hair colour.

But the most popular dolls have pale skin, huge boobs and measure between five foot two and five foot seven tall.

 

 

 

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Take away the talk function and we have a perfect invention.

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4 hours ago, Hawk_Eye said:

 

Where to get the story..

Cryptocurrencies have hit the headlines again this week, but this time it is not for good reasons. Nicknamed “WannaMine”, a new malware variant has been taking over computers around the world, hijacking them to mine a cryptocurrency called Monero.

WannaMine was first discovered by Panda Security in October last year, but the malware is only just coming to the attention of the general public, thanks to a number of high profile infections. But unlike other malware variants, WannaMine is proving particularly hard to detect and block.

.................

Interestingly, on all my PC's I always have the task manager open, Even when the web-browser itself uses too much CPU, I close it and restart the session. When my PC is idle, I force it to really be IDLE. CPU usage must be less than 1%, otherwise I check which processes are running and if not necessary (windows or anti-virus updates),  I kill the processes...

I may be a control freak.... I think... :-P

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8 hours ago, Barnacle said:

Interestingly, on all my PC's I always have the task manager open, Even when the web-browser itself uses too much CPU, I close it and restart the session. When my PC is idle, I force it to really be IDLE. CPU usage must be less than 1%, otherwise I check which processes are running and if not necessary (windows or anti-virus updates),  I kill the processes...

I may be a control freak.... I think... :-P

Jip, we can do that but 95% of people are simply "operators".  I have quite a string machine so it seldom suffers - but I have a bad habit with browser tabs.  I sometimes have four different browsers open (testing software etc)  and each has about 20+ tabs open.

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