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Guest Viva Alonso

F1 Technical -- for us dummies

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Guest Viva Alonso   
Guest Viva Alonso

Here is some clips that explains a few things about f1 in a bit more detail .. if you want to know more... take the time and view the clips its worth it.

How do Formula One cars work?

How does a push-rod suspension?

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Guest Viva Alonso   
Guest Viva Alonso

How do pull-rod suspensions work? What is a pull-rod suspension? Formula One pull-rod suspensions, like those used by Ferrari for the 2012 series will be examined in this video.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pkcWMl9dpcg&feature=relmfu

How do Formula One brakes work? What are the benefits of carbon ceramic brakes? This video explains the brakes and technology used in Formula One racing.

"]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YNlGwXdGpAI&feature=episodic

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Guest Viva Alonso   
Guest Viva Alonso

Watch Sauber Formula 1 team to cut the C31 in half. Many things will be revealed that will impress you in the this amazing video. (note the apple he has in his hands)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MkIUvBZ5ACY&feature=related

How does a front wing used in Formula 1 work? What is the purpose of a front wing?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nvZ2PUBKmSI&feature=relmfu

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Guest Jo-Jo   
Guest Jo-Jo

Thanks for this thread Viva! I'm one of those dummies unfortunately. Have been watching F1 since 1992, and am very passionate about the sport, but know very little about the fine technical things.

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Guest Viva Alonso   
Guest Viva Alonso

Pleasure is all mine, still have hours of footage and lots of articles will post over time.( see I dont only post garbage as some believe) haha

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Guest Solar   
Guest Solar

During the race we saw Newey study a photo showing the damage to Vettel's car and a bit later a slow-mo of another bit of bodywork flying off.

It would be interesting to know what effect the damage had on his performance.

One would expect that it would've affected his rear downforce and tyre wear.

And should that not be taken into account when discussing his race performance,

Solar.

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DbDraad    660

During the race we saw Newey study a photo showing the damage to Vettel's car and a bit later a slow-mo of another bit of bodywork flying off.

It would be interesting to know what effect the damage had on his performance.

One would expect that it would've affected his rear downforce and tyre wear.

And should that not be taken into account when discussing his race performance,

Solar.

The turbulence would have seriously influenced the aerodynamics of the car as well. Airflow through the car might have had serious effects on the cooling of certain components, but luckily not.

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vlagman    992

During the race we saw Newey study a photo showing the damage to Vettel's car and a bit later a slow-mo of another bit of bodywork flying off.

It would be interesting to know what effect the damage had on his performance.

One would expect that it would've affected his rear downforce and tyre wear.

And should that not be taken into account when discussing his race performance,

Solar.

I saw a discussion on the TV where they said that apparently it mostly affected him when the track dried and they started doing high speeds. When it was raining and they were not doing those high speeds, it did not have much of an influence. What really hampered him was the communications, or lack of communication and that could apparently also have been due to the accident.

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vlagman    992

Spekulasie.

Is moontlik ja. Wat weet oud renjaers, spanbase en ontwerpers van formule een karre in elk geval? Duidelik weet hulle fokol. Plaas kom vra hulle die kenners op Supersupporter voor hulle sulke kak uitlatings maak.

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Guest Solar   
Guest Solar

This is more like the type of explanation I was asking for Flags:

Red Bull feared that Sebastian Vettel would be forced out of the Brazilian Grand Prix as the result of his opening lap clash with Bruno Senna.

The German was spun after colliding with Senna on the entry to Turn 4, and he was hit again by the Brazilian when his Red Bull was facing the wrong way.

The contact badly damaged the rear bodywork of Vettel's Red Bull car, and left team chiefs on the pit wall worrying that their title chances were about to be derailed.

When asked if there was concern that the damage was big enough to cause Vettel to retire, team principal Christian Horner said: "Absolutely.

"There was quite a lot of damage to the exhaust and they're sensitive bits of equipment. So for them to receive an impact like that, of course, it was massively concerning."

Red Bull technical chief Adrian Newey believed that the damage to the car was at the absolute limit of what it could take.

"It's probably about as bad as you can possibly have and still finish the race," he told AUTOSPORT.

Newey was seen studying close-up images of Vettel's damaged car on the pit wall in the early stages of the race. He revealed that the team had to react at various stages of the race to ensure that the damage did not get worse.

"We monitor the loads through the pushrods, as I'm sure all teams do, so we could see that we had lost downforce, particularly at the rear," he added.

"At the first stop, we adjusted the front wing slightly.

"But you're carrying that lack of downforce because there's nothing you can do about that.

"Then the other big concern was the crease that we could see in the exhaust system.

"If the exhaust breaks, which there has to be a high probability of with that sort of damage, it would probably catch the bodywork on fire at that point and your race is over.

"So we changed the engine mapping to try and minimise the exhaust temperature. We lost a bit of performance in the process and just tried to get it home."

Despite the damage, Vettel secured a sixth place finish in the Brazilian GP that was good enough for him to secure his third straight title.

I wanted to know more on what they needed to do to manage his car,

Solar.

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vlagman    992

Thanks fir that. i missed that article. Yes, it was clear, through the race, that the exhaust was of great concern because they showed Newey, with images of the exhaust, a number of times. That is why I have such high regard for Newey. It is as if he is actually almost trying to be onboard, in situations like that. Think about how he was shown studying the images of Vettel's front wing in Abu Dhabi, and comparing it with a normal one. Remember that he is an oldk-school pencil and drawing bard kind of engineer. So he is better equiped to work out the influences of that kind of damages on the fly.

If there is one thing aspect where I am seriously jealous of RBR, it is that they have Newey in their camp. Macca missed the boat big time when they lost him.

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Guest Viva Alonso   
Guest Viva Alonso

Well we all know its V6 1600 Turbo charged engines.

 

Everything from the V-angle to materials used to the maximum fuel flow rate is spelled out in the regulations.

 

To meet weight reduction goals, magnesium is once again allowed for
certain applications, though engine blocks and heads are likely to be
cast from aluminum. A 15,000 rpm rev limit is allowed. (currently 18000rpm)

 

New for 2014 is the previously-mentioned fuel flow limit, capped at 100 kg/h and monitored by a newly-required fuel flow meter.

 

500bar Fuel injection pressure limit.

 

Aside from the displacement downsizing, the big news for 2014 is F1’s return
to turbocharging, last used in the sport during the 1980s. Only
single-turbo designs are permitted, and the rules go so far as to specify exactly where the turbo must be positioned.

 

100kg Maximum amount of fuel teams can use per race from 2014.

 

The loss of power from this reduction in capacity will be recouped in part
by the addition of a turbocharger. In this sense, the configuration
is not dissimilar to the 1.5-litre turbos used by many teams from 1977 to 1988.

 

KERS now known as ERS (engine Recovery Systems)


161bhp Power boost from ERS, up from 80bhp

33.3s Duration of boost available, up from 6.7s

2MJ Maximum energy that can be harvested from ERS, up from 400kJ

 

The most radical changes are in the realm of Energy Recovery Systems. The
change of name reflects the fact that heat as well as kinetic
energy may now be recovered. The regulations refer to the two devices as the ‘Motor Generator Unit
– Kinetic’ and ‘Motor Generator Unit – Heat’. The latter uses heat energy from the turbo to generate electrical energy.


With two sources of recovered energy to use the limit on the amount of power
they can generate has been raised. Drivers will now get a
bigger boost for longer, which in addition to the thrust from the turbo engines should make for quite a spectacle.

 

Complete Unit

 

5 Maximum units per season, down from 8

145kg minimum weight of engine and ERS, down from 95kg excluding KERS

 

At present each engine has to last three race distances with some units
needing to do four. From next year most if not all engines will have to
last four race distances, assuming the calendar remains at around 19 or 20 races.

 

F1 engine manufacturers stopped issuing details of their power outputs
during the 1990s. But since F1 engine technology was frozen with
the introduction of the current V8s in 2006, the consensus view is today’s cars have around 750bhp.


Their replacements are expected to produce about 550bhp – before the addition of further power from ERS is taken into account.

Edited by Viva Alonso

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vlagman    992

Now this is something that I have just noticed:

 

New for 2014 is the previously-mentioned fuel flow limit, capped at 100 kg/h and monitored by a newly-required fuel flow meter.


 


500bar Fuel injection pressure limit.

Does Honest Horner know about that or will we be hearing whining "fuel flow limit, fuel flow limit, fuel flow limit, fuel flow limit................" in 12 months time?
 

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Guest Wolverine   
Guest Wolverine

got to say , the fuel  limit is disturbing. never mind cruising to save tyres, it's going to be about cruising to save fuel.

 

Although, having said that, I'm not sure what the current tanks carry. 320km to race, thats 3.2km per litre... bit of a tall order for (hopefully) around 750hp..

 

restricting maximum fuel flow is as good a way as any to restrict engine power.

 

from the sound of it - they might as well just appoint a supplier of these motors, sounds like the FIA has done the complete design!!!

 

going to be interesting to see how the body work copes with the additional heat soak. been a while since a body has caught fire off the exhaust, but turbos run hotter!

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Guest Viva Alonso   
Guest Viva Alonso

Some more info on 2014 cars

 

Front wing will be narrower, 1.65 m instead of the current 1.80 m. Also, there will only be one exhaust pipe thus no blown diffusers. (No Blow diffuser no Red Bull, this is good...)

In 2014 there will be no more 'Coanda' effect - exhausts will have to exit between 3-5cm forward of the centre line of the rear wheels and no more than 25cm from the centre line of the car. From there, it will be impossible to blow them at the edges of the floor.

 

Nose lower... In 2012, F1 cars had a maximum front nose height of 550mm above the floor of the car. In 2014, that is being reduced to 185mm - a reduction in height of 365mm.

 

2014_F1_zps887105bc.jpg

 

Lower rear beam wing - a downforce-producing device at the bottom of the rear wing where it is attached to the back of the car will be dropped too.

 

 

 

Regarding an earlier post -- cars use about 150kg of fuel (about 195 litres) in a Grand Prix; in 2014, they will be allowed to consume no more than 100kg (130l).

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