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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 06/18/2020 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    Seems like he doesn’t like South Africans. Could it have something to do with the 2009 B&I Lions tour?
  2. 2 points
    ATM I am running at 2l per day
  3. 2 points
    The pitfalls of wrongthink Laurence Fox From magazine issue: 20 June 2020 First they came for the statues, then Basil Fawlty got ‘cancelled’ and three spoiled millionaires turned on their creator. So it was with J.K. Rowling’s woke progeny. Harry Potter, it would seem, is deathly shallow. Rupert Grint looked for a moment like holding firm, but he too quickly succumbed to the growing pressure to slip his golden dagger between Rowling’s shoulder blades. Surely these rich list regulars are perfectly placed to say what they actually think, protected from the ever-tightening vice of censorship? Apparently not. Fearing for their virtue or their future or both, the three children rounded on their mother. We must hope for better from Neville Longbottom. I, too, have come to the conclusion that I may never get an acting job again without expressing ‘correct’ opinions. While this probably isn’t the end of the world for you, it is a cause of some sadness and anxiety for me. Not least because I’ve always loved my job and also because I have two children who need dinner and clothes and a holiday once in a while. In my job there is a lot of waiting around and a lot of banter and more serious conversations that take place on set. Until very recently, my views on life were met mostly with good humour and, if not always agreed with, always respectfully tolerated. The genesis of this rather bleak view of my prospects came after my appearance on Question Time, where I voiced (slightly exasperatedly) a heresy that I’m fairly confident is held by a sizeable proportion of the population. The heresy was that, far from being hounded out by the baying racists of this statistically very tolerant and diverse country, Meghan Markle might, just might, have left for other reasons. Having spent years around actors, a fairly common trait is an enormous ego and the desire to be the centre of attention. I include myself very firmly in this bracket. So with little mental gymnastics involved, I wondered whether her departure might have had something to do with her being denied the limelight she craved. I’d said this before on Gogglebox and no one had batted an eyelid. But that was six months earlier, which — amid such blossoming clusters of the pathogenic spread of the woke religion — is an eternity. My opinion was further bolstered as I watched the brave and admired prince slowly compost and droop before our eyes into a bit of a sop; less Prince Hal, more Prince ‘Hang on, what do I say next, darling?’ In this progressive monoculture, with its zealous quest for faraway utopias, I had committed a grave sin. I had used my white privilege to ‘berate and bully’ a person of colour, as the ethnic minority sub-committee of the actors’ union Equity put it. ‘Denounce him! Disgraceful!’ came the cries from the illiberal liberals, who see race in every injustice and cry ‘fascism’ at anyone who doesn’t view the world from their same narrow and unstable ledge of conformity. The media had a field day. Fortunately I’d had the sense, before my brain became so scrambled I couldn’t think, to hire myself a very good lawyer (something others without my dwindling financial privilege can ill afford) and Equity was reminded politely but firmly that the clue to its job was in the title of the organisation. It agreed to apologise and remunerated me for my troubles. Subsequently the whole of the Equity’s newly formed race equality committee resigned, and as far as I can tell, the whole union seems to be on wobbly ground. Time passed. I set about removing the tar and feathers and the left-wing commentariat patted itself on the back and moved on. Deliberately or not, though, they missed the real story. Which was more likely: that Britain is an overwhelmingly tolerant and welcoming country, one that people risk their lives attempting to reach, or that Britain is a place where racism and bigotry hide in plain sight? One of these stories sells papers and the other is true. In this progressive monoculture, with its zealous quest for faraway utopias, I committed a grave sin Anyway, all this is by the by. I use this story to point out that even in the smallest, most apparently meaningless situations, identity politics can cause ripples that turn into bigger and more powerful waves when whipped up by the winds of the outrage media. Our silence at their corruption is read by them as consent. On 25 May the world watched as a policeman kneeled on a man’s neck for almost nine minutes, killing him. Our jaws dropped in horror and disgust. Something needed to be done. Justice needed to be done and seen to be done. On that, all were agreed. Black lives matter — three such powerful words. Words we all could unite behind. But was it that simple? A week later, I got a text from a very well-known young actor with a screenshot of a tweet of mine which read: ‘Every single human life is precious. The end.’ ‘Can you explain this to me?’ said the message. My phone rang; I picked it up and knew straight away that my friend and I were not alone on the call. I heard a quiet shushing, an awkward pause, the white noise on the line changed to speakerphone levels, the louder background and less intimate voice that give these things away. ‘Hey Loz… I want to really understand you… I mean… I defend you and as you know… I really love you… [You’re an actor, the only thing you love is the mirror, darling] but this… this is really hard…’ ‘Which part of it?’ I said. ‘Can’t you see it’s just wrong?’ they said. ‘What?’ I said. ‘Loz…’ came the gently menacing reply. ‘How can I defend you, man? When you are saying shit like this?’ ‘Shit like what?’ I said. ‘That every single human life is precious? Which part of that is problematic for you?’ ‘It’s racist,’ came the reply. Cue deep sigh. Let me say at this point that I firmly believe that most people take the BLM mission statement at face value and support it in kind. I’m aware that I am not black and have no concept of the lived experience of anyone other than myself. Now where was I? Yes. I asked my ‘chum’ what they saw when they looked at the media coverage of this whole story. I asked whether they had heard of David Dorn (a retired policeman gunned down by a looter attempting to rob a pawn shop) once the rioting began, in the news. I asked whether they thought it was in any way significant that David Dorn (also a black life) had been murdered in cold blood, yet George Floyd’s senseless killing dominated every headline. I asked whether they thought it was significant that the man who gunned down David Dorn when caught would be charged with first-degree murder, and yet George Floyd’s killer would be tried for second-degree murder at best. I asked: was this fair? I asked whether the media might perhaps be complicit in fanning the flames of outrage? Whether George Floyd’s equally precious life was being used to serve other, more sinister objectives? There was a silence. We ended the call frostily and haven’t spoken since. My conclusion is that this tragic situation has become part of another narrative, a series of stories wound together to serve a broader societal aim. Righteous global outrage at a cruel and vile killing has morphed into a different agenda. Similar things have happened with other movements; #MeToo,Extinction Rebellion, Brexit, even the Covid-19 pandemic. The left rightly expose great chasms of inequality and hypocrisy in society — then proceed to throw themselves like lemmings into that void, unable to obey their own edicts. Desperately important causes have been politicised to the point of meaninglessness, opportunities for action hijacked swiftly by the cynical actors. No human being could fail to be appalled by what happened to George Floyd. We were united in our outrage. But what could have been a moment for unity has instead torn us apart. All injustice needs our collective and righteous anger. But the pursuit of that justice should bring us together, not divide us. Not social justice, not climate justice, not black justice. Just justice. We must start with what unites us, beginning with trying to see the best in people. Though some will exploit our good faith, we should offer it nevertheless. We must be aware of biased media, including our own state broadcaster the BBC. It has moved from the Jeremy Bowen-style ‘show not tell’ reportage of old, to one that describes protests that led to hospitalisations and mass arrests as ‘largely peaceful’. Some news suppliers have decided to relativise, and even encourage, angry mob tactics. So here I am, a white posh bloke, who loves his job, who has worked hard to be good at it, facing an uncertain future — all for the heinous sin of shaking my fist at the ugly, hypocritical and inconsistent god of progressivism. But unhappily for some (my agent and bank manager mainly) I will continue to say what I believe to be true. I’m not always right and very often wrong, but unless we can accommodate multiple understandings of a situation soon, it will all end with us abandoning words and reason, the tools given to us to heal and come together, in favour of the simpler but far more terrifying tools of engagement: fists, knives and guns. It’s already happening, and we should all be concerned by it. We cannot stand by in silence. Words are the answer.
  4. 1 point
    Hope you spoilt today and have a great year ahead
  5. 1 point
    imho, all this new crap about BLM & taking the knee etc by the Proteas refers - As i remember it, the ANC demanded a quota system for all sporting codes. i definitely don't remember any players complaining when they were selected, but now, years later we hear that they encountered racism in the team.........? i also remember a lot of people on this forum being VERY unhappy with the way everything was handled, and they predicted it would all collapse and that standards would drop. They were 100% correct.
  6. 1 point
  7. 1 point
    He clearly likes Kiwis, Welsh and English..Unfortunately in 100 years no Scot players comes close to any world team
  8. 1 point
    So just seen on Sky that the unions are up in arms about National Theatre redundancies. They forget how they chased BP and Shell away last year. Fucking scumflakes
  9. 1 point
    Both meanings of dense apply
  10. 1 point
    It was a bit of TIC about MB's decision about their colour scheme and the reason for it. I can't support the team for that. MB is the main reason why I watch F1.
  11. 1 point
    Fuck it! So watching F1 is also out the window.
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  13. 1 point
    Ja ek dink hulle is bekommerd ons verloor ons tweede plek per kapita in die wereld. n' Ou moet mos maar sy kant bring. The ten countries with the highest beer consumption per capita (in liters) are: Czech Republic (143.3) Namibia (108) Austria (106) Germany (104.2) Poland (100.8) Ireland (98.2) Romania (94.1) Seychelles (90) Estonia (89.5) Lithuania (88.7)
  14. 1 point
  15. 1 point
    Surely Kipling was a colonialist and racist.
  16. 1 point
  17. 1 point
    We need more like him. Luckily Vera Lynn never lived to see them come for the White Cliffs of Dover.
  18. 1 point
    So I see Oriel College has chickened out. So much for universities and free speech. Bet they keep the money though. Let’s see how many BAME students refuse the grants on principle.
  19. 1 point
    Ek verwys na die ondersteuners.
  20. 1 point
    Can’t remember one Pretorianer in the mean machine.
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  23. 1 point
    it's feelgood muzak...................
  24. 1 point
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  26. 1 point
    Jammer om te hoor. When I grew up in the 80's, cancer was a horrible disease a very few people get. Today I know more people with cancer than any other serious disease. Good thing though, is that the success stories are becoming much more frequent too. Quite a few people close to me are actively dealing with this monster....some better than others... Vasbyt!!!
  27. 1 point
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  29. 1 point
    Our maid left us a message on Friday, she says she'll be working from home until further notice.
  30. 1 point
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  33. 1 point
    Still hilarious!!
  34. 1 point
    Hahahaha. How true is this?: Socialism = Rape Capitalism = Consensual sex.
  35. 1 point
    I always thought an Americano would be thick and fat
  36. 1 point
  37. 1 point
    https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=duck+song
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  42. 1 point
    There is a medical distinction between “Guts” and “Balls”. We've heard colleagues referring to people with “Guts”, or with “Balls”. Do they, however, know the difference between them? Here’s the official distinction; straight from the British Medical Journal: Volume 323; page 295.   GUTS - Is arriving home late, after a night out with the lads, being met by your wife with a broom, and having the “Guts” to ask: “Are you still cleaning, or are you flying somewhere?”   BALLS - Is coming home late after a night out with the lads, smelling of perfume and beer, lipstick on your collar, slapping your wife on the ass and having the “Balls” to say: 'You're next, Chubby.'   I trust this clears up any confusion. Medically speaking, there is no difference in outcome; both are fatal. 
  43. 1 point
  44. 1 point
    Talk about frustration! "Sorry, your password has been in use for 30 days and has expired - you must register a new one." 'roses' "Sorry, too few characters." 'pretty roses' "Sorry, you must use at least one numerical character." '1 pretty rose' "Sorry, you cannot use blank spaces." '1prettyrose' "Sorry, you must use at least 10 different characters." '1fuckingprettyrose' "Sorry, you must use at least one upper case character." '1FUCKINGprettyrose' "Sorry, you cannot use more than one upper case character consecutively." '1FuckingPrettyRose' "Sorry, you must use no fewer than 20 total characters." '1FuckingPrettyRoseShovedUpYourAssIfYouDon'tGiveMeAccessRightFuckingNow' "Sorry, that password is already in use."
  45. 1 point
    Sorry. I forgot to add the last sentence. ".......the end. "
  46. 1 point
    SIMPLE TRUTH 1 Lovers help each other undress before sex. However after sex, they always dress on their own. Moral of the story: In life, no one helps you once you're screwed. SIMPLE TRUTH 2 When a lady is pregnant, all her friends touch her stomach and say, "Congrats". But, none of them come and touch the man's penis and say, "Good job". Moral of the story: "Hard work is never appreciated." SIX RULES TO REMEMBER IN LIFE 1. Money cannot buy happiness, but it's more comfortable to cry in an Aston Martin than on a bicycle. 2. Forgive your enemy, but remember the ass-hole's name. (Fo Sho) 3. If you help someone when they're in trouble, they will remember you when they're in trouble again. (Too true!!!) 4. Many people are alive only because it's illegal to shoot them. 5. Alcohol does not solve any problems, but then neither does milk. 6. Condoms don't guarantee safe sex. A friend of mine was wearing one, when he was shot by the woman's husband.
  47. 1 point
    UNITED NATIONS SURVEY: Last month a world-wide survey was conducted by the UN. The only question asked was: "Could you please give your honest opinion about solutions to the food shortage in the rest of the world?" The survey was a massive failure for the following reasons: 1. In Eastern Europe they didn't know what "honest" meant. 2. In Western Europe they didn't know what "shortage" meant. 3. In Africa they didn't know what "food" meant. 4. In China they didn't know what "opinion" meant. 5. In the Middle East they didn't know what "solution" meant. 6. In South America they didn't know what "please" meant. 7. In the USA they didn't know what "the rest of the world" meant. 8. In the UK they hung up as soon as they heard the Indian accent.
  48. 1 point
    At any given time, the urge to sing 'The Lion Sleeps Tonight' is just a whim away. A whim away, A whim away, A whim away.
  49. 1 point
    A man went to Liverpool City Centre having seen an advert for a Gynaecologist's Assistant. Naturally interested, he went in and asked the clerk for details. The clerk pulled up the file and read; "The job entails getting the ladies ready for the gynaecologist. " "You have to help the women out of their underwear, lay them down and carefully wash their private regions, then apply shaving foam and gently shave off their pubic hair, then rub in soothing oils so they're ready for the gynaecologist's examination." "The annual salary is £130,000, and if you're interested you'll have to go to Glasgow." " My God, is that where the job is?" asked the man. She answered: "No Sir, that's where the end of the queue is."
  50. 1 point
    I was invited into the Billiard room the other night by this really hot blonde, she climbed on the snooker table on all fours facing away from me and i noticed she was not wearing undies, she then said, it's your night, you can have Pink or Brown...i thought for a moment and said, "how the fuck am i supposed to do that if you're on the fucking table you silly ..."
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